Book reviewer extraordinaire!

Posts tagged ‘Literature’

The Letter D

I have been reading books to my PreK and Kindergarten students. Big surprise. The authors all have last names that begin with the letter D. This week I read a great book to them called Sody Salleratus by Aubrey Davis.

I had no clue what sody salleratus was or meant, all I knew is the author’s last name began with a D and it looked cute. We actually learned that sody salleratus was also known as baking soda. This story is not really about baking soda. It is an Applachian Three Billy Goats Gruff. The Old Woman decides to bake biscuits and needs her sody salleratus. She sends Boy to the grocer to buy some, which he dutifully complies. On the way back home he crosses a bridge only to be accosted by a large grumpy bear. Once the bear eats Boy the story moves on. The Old Woman proceeds to send Girl, then Old Man, and then herself to find out what has taken them so long to return home. All are eaten by the bear. Oh, did I forget to mention that they had a squirrel living on the mantlepiece? Yep, and squirrel goes last to find Old Woman, Old Man, Girls and Boy only to discover the bear and his boasting at eating them all.

Squirrel ends up outsmarting the bear and … well, there is a happily ever after to this story that includes the biscuits, thanks to the sody salleratus, and a bear skin rug.

The kids love the repetitive story line and begin to “read” it with me. They love the roaring and growling of the bear. Sody Salleratus is a fun little tale great to share.

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Ever wonder?

NorthangeAlibi   Did you ever wonder what happened to the book you read when you werea kid? You know, the Louisecover_haunted_libraryones that were full of adventure and mystery? The ones that were full of real romance and fantasy? Those books that made us fall in love with history and sci-fi?

Well, they are back. Not the ones we read way back then but new modern books that can make you enjoy fantastical battles, solve great mysteries and fall in love all over again. Where, you ask?

Here! Well, not here, but at CleanAuthors.com! What’s better? A 99-Cent Back to School Event! On September 13th, yes, Friday the 13th, the authors on CleanAuthors.com will be offering numerous books for 99 cents each from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and other vendors and in various formats.

At CleanAuthors.com you will find children’s, YA (young adult), and adult literature. Various genre to choose from: fantasy, romance, historical, Christian, LDS, and more.

Join us at CleanAuthors.com!!

 

Fairy Tale Read-a-Thon Starting Line and Progress Post

"One of the lovely things about writing i...

“One of the lovely things about writing is you can get revenge.” -Gail Carson Levine (Photo credit: MrSchuReads)

Gail Carson Levine is one of my favorite authors. She writes books anyone can read, but what I find wonderful about her books is they show young girls that they can overcome adversity. Her books are so well written that some of my boys, those who are willing to give a “girl’s book” a chance, find they love them and begin recommending them to their peers.
Great for all ages. Great for all genders.

Pages Unbound | Book Reviews & Discussions

The Details

  • What: An event to read fairy tales and retellings, with minichallenges almost every day and a Twitter chat on Sept. 6.
  • Where: Debz Bookshelf (Click for details.)
  • When: Sept. 1- Sept. 7

My To-Read List

This is open to change, particularly if I get to the library where I can get other fairy tales, but here are some books I am considering reading for the event.

My Progress

September 1

September 2

September 3

September 4

September 5

September 6

September 7

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Summer Break

13-Gordon Korman 39 Clues Cahills vs Vespers

13-Gordon Korman 39 Clues Cahills vs Vespers (Photo credit: Scholastic Inc.)

The 39 Clues

The 39 Clues (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Well, folks. This is when I get caught up on my growth up reading! I will not be posting too much for elementary aged children here unless I find something new or unexpected. I did read another 39 Clues: Cahills vs Vespers (#6), Day of Doom, this week. By David Baldacci.

I have to say I liked the way he wrote this final(?) book of this series. A little darkness but also revelations about the who the characters ultimately are to themselves and to those around them.

Warning; however, there is some sadness. There will be death and redemption in this particular book.

Great job Mr. Baldacci! I look forward to more of your writing in this series (The 39 Clues).

The Sword Bearer by Teddy Jacobs

You may know by now that I do not usually write bad reviews. I can find something good about any story I read. Unfortunately, this book broke the mold. I really did not find anything worthwhile in this book.

“Tired of his controlling father treating him like a child, sixteen-year-old Anders Tomason yearns for grown-up adventure. Until the day when he opens a magic portal by accident, and a Kriek girl bursts into his locked room with a chemical warlock hot on her trail. Now Anders will discover just how much his parents had been protecting him from, and at what cost.” Goodreads excerpt.

Read on March 25, 2013
I like reading new YA fiction because you usually find some lovely gems. However, gem this story was not. I kept hoping the story would take off but I felt like I was treading water. I did not feel any real angst for Anders, the pimply-faced teen who just seems to flounder. While the story started off slowly it really did not give me enough information for me to bond with him as a main character. In fact, I could not bond with any of the characters. I felt no loss at the deaths, I felt no relief when Anders and his friends made their way to safety. Nothing. The story did not draw me in. The worst part of the story was the abrupt ending. Actually, it did not “end” at all. The story just stopped in a weird place. The inserted first chapter of book two felt more like the ending of book one.

It also felt as though the author really has no clue as to how modern teens speak or think. Jacobs tried too hard to be a sixteen year old boy. Too many references to pimples and the characters were too flat and unbelievable. I would not suggest reading this book until it has had a couple go-rounds with an editor and serious re-writing to flesh out the characters and storyline.

Witch and Wizard by James Patterson

This is another series for young adults by James Patterson. I have only read the first book and do not really plan to read the remaining books in the series as it did not capture my interest.

The series is about a society in which being a witch or wizard is against the law and anyone possessing those abilities are removed from their homes, sentenced, and punished to the full extent of the law. In the first book of the series a tween and teen sister and brother are abjectly removed from their homes and thrown into prison for being a witch and wizard, something they knew nothing about. Their parents do not say much and you really do not get a feeling of a the normal nuclear family even though Patterson tries to paint the picture with words. It just does not feel right. There is no connection.

Again Patterson attempts to write dialog intended for teens and children and he misses the mark. I am not sure he is doing the work himself or if someone is helping him but he may want to hang out at a public school to get the real way in which kids speak nowadays.

As with his other young adult work, Maximum Ride, Witch and Wizard come close but do not hit the mark.

 

Welcome!

I am starting a new review blog to focus on children’s books. Fiction and nonfiction alike!

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